What did the creature want of Frankenstein?

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teachersage eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I agree that the monster wants love from Frankenstein. Frankenstein is his creator, his parent. Like any child, the creature craves a parent's love and acceptance.

Instead, he meets with rejection. Frankenstein has single-mindedly pursued his obsession with creating life out of dead bodies parts but has never bothered to imagine how the living creature would appear. When it does spring to life, Frankenstein is appalled and abandons his creation.

Ironically, Frankenstein has already told with approval the story of the love his own parents lavished on him:

My mother’s tender caresses and my father’s smile of benevolent pleasure while regarding me are my first recollections. I was their plaything and their idol, and something better—their child, the innocent and helpless creature bestowed on them by Heaven, whom to bring up to good, and whose future lot it was in their hands to direct to happiness or misery, according as they fulfilled their duties towards me.

Frankenstein is utterly unable to replicate that love for his own creation and so "directs ...misery" to him. Not able to find affection from his "parent," the creature seeks an alternative vessel for his affection. Frankenstein finally agrees to create a woman so that the monster will not be utterly alone but then, in horror, destroys her.

At this point, the monster wishes that Frankenstein experience the anguish that he has felt and so kills those who Frankenstein loves. If the creature cannot have his creator's love, he wants his hate. In this, he succeeds. Frankenstein says of the monster:

My abhorrence of this fiend cannot be conceived. When I thought of him I gnashed my teeth, my eyes became inflamed, and I ardently wished to extinguish that life which I had so thoughtlessly bestowed. When I reflected on his crimes and malice, my hatred and revenge burst all bounds of moderation.

Michael Foster eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The creature wanted validation as a human being from a human being.  Regardless of his most immediate origin, the creature was created from human flesh.  To get technical, his DNA was that of a human (though of course DNA was unknown at that time).    Yet Victor consistently thinks of him as "non-human."  In time, the creature comes to agree with him, seeing himself as opposed to those humans who consistently rejected him.

The creature also wanted  instruction from Victor.  Since Victor immediately deserted him, this was denied the creature, so he sought it elsewhere.  Yet on the discovery of Victor's notes in the pocket of the greatcoat, the creature did learn from Victor, yet not in the way either would have wanted.

Companionship was another  request of the creature.  Since Victor refused to grant him this, the creature demanded that Victor create a woman for him, someone with whom he could travel away from the human world and seek the solace found in the presence of someone like himself. 

Above all, the creature wanted love, the love due to a creature from his creator.  The creature knew what love was.  As Shelley displayed the Enlightenment philosophy that man is born good, the creature was born with an inate ability to love and a need to be loved.    Monsters are created when society denies an individual this love, as Victor did to the creature.  Victor's scientific skill made a creature.  His rejection created a monster.

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Frankenstein

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