What developments enabled Andrew Jackson to become president? How did he influence national politics in the 1820s?

The “corrupt bargain” of 1824 deprived Andrew Jackson of the presidency, but John Quincy Adams's presidential failures, the split in the dominant political party, the expansion of voting rights, and the perception of Jackson as the candidate of the common man all led to Jackson's election in 1828.

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In the 1820s, Andrew Jackson was a hot-headed, wild-card war hero turned politician. He got caught up in the election of 1824, in which four candidates ran from a single political party. No one earned the majority of either popular or electoral college votes, so the election was decided by...

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In the 1820s, Andrew Jackson was a hot-headed, wild-card war hero turned politician. He got caught up in the election of 1824, in which four candidates ran from a single political party. No one earned the majority of either popular or electoral college votes, so the election was decided by the House of Representatives through what became known as the “corrupt bargain.” Even though Jackson had more popular and electoral votes than any other candidate, John Quincy Adams took the presidency.

Adams, however, did not fare well as president. He proposed a broad nationalist scheme that placed a great deal of power in the hands of the federal government, and his actions began to split that single party of 1824 into the National-Republicans under Adams and the Democratic-Republicans under Jackson.

By the time the 1828 election rolled around, Jackson was ready to fight for the presidency yet again. He was careful to keep his mouth firmly closed about the actual issues. He ran as a war hero and a representative of the common man, and indeed, many of those common men were fed up with Adams and other political leaders who seemed to talk a lot and do nothing. They wanted someone they could relate to, someone who came from the West yet had the support of the South, and someone who was not a perceived aristocrat. Indeed, more and more of those common men were obtaining the right to vote as more and more states adopted universal white male suffrage, or at least abolished property ownership requirements. Jackson was the kind of politician these new voters were looking for: a tenacious frontiersman who understood them, and indeed, Jackson won the 1828 election by a wide margin.

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