What are some of the details revealed by the author in "The Most Dangerous Game"?"Details" is a literary term, and I need an example.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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I have provided a list of pertinent facts and information provided by the author in "The Most Dangerous Game."

  • The protagonist is Sanger Rainsford, a world-renowned big game hunter on his way to hunt jaguars along the Amazon River.
  • The antagonist is General Zaroff, a Russian Cossack who loves to hunt but has become bored with many aspects of it.
  • The setting is Ship-Trap Island, Zaroff's home located somewhere in the Caribbean Sea.
  • The two men meet when Rainsford accidentally falls off his yacht and swims ashore.
  • Zaroff's chateau is magnificently furnished, and he seems to enjoy all the luxuries of life, despite his isolation and the remote location of the island.

The dining room to which Ivan conducted him was in many ways remarkable. There was a medieval magnificence about it; it suggested a baronial hall of feudal times with its oaken panels, its high ceiling, its vast refectory tables where twoscore men could sit down to eat. About the hall were mounted heads of many animals--lions, tigers, elephants, moose, bears; larger or more perfect specimens Rainsford had never seen. At the great table the general was sitting, alone.

  • Also living on the island is Zaroff's servant, Ivan--a giant of a man and a former Cossack who served under the general.
  • Zaroff cuts an impressive figure:

Rainsford's first impression was that the man was singularly handsome; his second was that there was an original, almost bizarre quality about the general's face. He was a tall man past middle age, for his hair was a vivid white; but his thick eyebrows and pointed military mustache were as black as the night from which Rainsford had come. His eyes, too, were black and very bright. He had high cheekbones, a sharpcut nose, a spare, dark face--the face of a man used to giving orders, the face of an aristocrat.

 

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