What is the density of mercury in kg/m^3 ?

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The density of metal, mercury, is 13.546 gm/cm^3 or, 13,546 kg/m^3. The density of water is much less, in comparison, and is only 1000 kg/m^3. That is, mercury is about 13.5 times heavier than water and hence a specific gravity of 13.546. Interestingly, this density is one of the reasons why we use mercury in the barometers (devices used for measuring pressure) and not water. The atmospheric pressure is about 760 mm of mercury. Imagine if we used water in place of mercury, we would require a column about 13.5 times taller (or about 10.25 meters in length). Mercury is the only metal which is in liquid state at room temperature and is commonly used in the thermometers for measuring temperature. Mercury is also toxic to various life-forms and its use is carefully regulated. Hope this helps.
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