What delusion does Lennie experience as he is waiting for George? Why does he remember this experience in Of Mice and Men?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

The first delusion that Lennie experiences is seeing the image of his Aunt Clara standing with her hands on her hips in a disapproving manner. Aunt Clara proceeds to chastise Lennie for his mistake and tells Lennie that he is selfish for ruining George 's life. The delusion of Aunt...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

The first delusion that Lennie experiences is seeing the image of his Aunt Clara standing with her hands on her hips in a disapproving manner. Aunt Clara proceeds to chastise Lennie for his mistake and tells Lennie that he is selfish for ruining George's life. The delusion of Aunt Clara represents Lennie's guilt and shame for accidentally killing Curley's wife. He recognizes that he has done something bad and Aunt Clara immediately comes to mind because she was Lennie's original guardian before George came along. The second delusion that Lennie experiences is seeing the image of a gigantic rabbit. The gigantic rabbit proceeds to ridicule Lennie about his mistake and says that George will leave him. The gigantic rabbit represents Lennie's inherent desire to tend rabbits. Lennie fears that he has lost his opportunity to one day tend rabbits on his own homestead by accidentally murdering Curley's wife.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Lennie sees two different items, well one actually transforms into the other. He sees his Aunt Clara and he sees a human-sized bunny.

I think he sees the Aunt because she represents morality to Lennie. He knows he has done something wrong and the ethos in him is triggered. The rabbit to me represents the passion of his or that which makes him happy: soft things, and the hope of livin' off the fatta the lan' one day with George.

Without George to direct his thoughts after this severe event, I think his brain's strongest thought processes took over.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team