What decision does Lord Capulet make for Juliet?

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At the beginning of the play, Lord Capulet is depicted as a tolerant, understanding father who believes that Juliet is too young to get married. When Paris asks if Lord Capulet has given any more thought to giving his daughter away, Capulet responds by saying that Juliet should wait two...

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At the beginning of the play, Lord Capulet is depicted as a tolerant, understanding father who believes that Juliet is too young to get married. When Paris asks if Lord Capulet has given any more thought to giving his daughter away, Capulet responds by saying that Juliet should wait two more years before making such a significant decision. Lord Capulet goes on to say that Juliet's consent is the most important thing to him and encourages Paris to woo his daughter. He then invites Paris to his masquerade ball, where he will have an opportunity to win Juliet's heart.

As the play progresses, Juliet meets Romeo at her father's ball and falls in love with him at first sight. Romeo and Juliet proceed to get married at Friar Laurence's cell in secret. Unfortunately, Tybalt attempts to get revenge on Romeo for attending his uncle's ball and ends up killing Mercutio. Romeo responds by killing Tybalt and is banished from Verona. Romeo's exile breaks Juliet's heart as she suffers from Tybalt's death and her husband's banishment.

Lord Capulet is under the impression that Juliet is simply mourning the death of her cousin and believes that marrying Paris will lift her spirits and heal her soul. Lord Capulet ends up giving his consent for Paris to marry Juliet and plans for their wedding to take place on Thursday. Essentially, Lord Capulet arranges Juliet's marriage and wedding without her consent, and she is forced to fake her own death to avoid marrying Paris.

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