What are Cordelia's and Kent's traits in King Lear?

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As he grew older and more experienced, successful, and confident as a playwright, Shakespeare learned he could express his own views and feelings through his characters. Cordelia here is telling the truth about human nature, evolution, and parent-child--especially father-daughter--relations. Little girls typically adore their fathers up to a certain age, but evolution has programmed them to turn their attentions and affections away to young and unrelated males. In modern life we see adolescent girls develop an interest in actors, rock stars, and others they used to call "those horrid boys!" Fathers, like Lear, continue to love their children as before, but they find themselves quarreling with their sons and have to realize that their daughters no longer consider them handsome, or wise, or funny, or anything else but rather quaint.

Cordelia is stating the simple fact that when girls reach adolescence they develop interests in males other than their fathers--although their fathers...

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