What is the connotative meaning of the poem? How does the author uses metaphor and simile in his poem to create his theme?  *Poem* Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the...

What is the connotative meaning of the poem?

How does the author uses metaphor and simile in his poem to create his theme?

 

*Poem*

Whose woods these are I think I know.

His house is in the village, though;

He will not see me stopping here

To watch his woods fill up with snow.

 

My little horse must think it queer

To stop without a farmhouse near

Between the woods and frozen lake

The darkest evening of the year.

 

He gives his harness bells a shake

To ask if there is some mistake.

The only other sound's the sweep

Of easy wind and downy flake.

 

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep,

But I have promises to keep,

And miles to go before I sleep,

And miles to go before I sleep.

 

Asked on by blue102

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William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

This is Robert Frost's most famous poem. It is extensively covered in various places in eNotes. The most common interpretation is that the speaker is contemplating committing suicide by walking out into the woods and lying down on the snow. Freezing to death is said to be a painless way to die. However, Frost himself repeatedly denied that his poem was expressing a disguised death wish. Frost claimed that what was important was the sound of the rhyme and meter and the picture of woods in the falling snow.

There are no metaphors or similes in this poem--unless the word "sleep" in the last two lines can be taken for a metaphor for death. This is something Frost himself denied.

One of the most interesting features of this lyrical poem is the unusual rhyme scheme, which seems to convey a sense of falling snow. Every aspect of this frequently anthologized poem is analyzed in various sections of eNotes. Many different interpretations have been suggested by contributors.

 

 

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