What connection does Gorge Orwell have to his theme in Animal Farm?

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Animal Farm is a brilliant satire of the Stalinist era of the USSR. Author George Orwell had a personal connection to this theme. Orwell (whose real name was Eric Arthur Blair) considered himself a democratic socialist, but he did not believe that Stalinist Russia was truly concerned with promoting democratic...

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Animal Farm is a brilliant satire of the Stalinist era of the USSR. Author George Orwell had a personal connection to this theme. Orwell (whose real name was Eric Arthur Blair) considered himself a democratic socialist, but he did not believe that Stalinist Russia was truly concerned with promoting democratic socialism. Rather, he believed that the Soviet Union was little more than a dictatorship based on Stalin's personality cult. He wanted to demonstrate--through an animal fable--that the Soviet Union was not truly Marxist.

Moreover, he wanted to show that Joseph Stalin was not a man socialists should idolize or emulate. This was especially important to Orwell, because many people in Great Britain (Orwell's nation of residence) were fond of Stalin and because Great Britain was allied with the Soviets during the early part of World War II.

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