What are the conflicts in Lord of the Flies?

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William Golding uses several major conflicts in Lord of the Flies to drive the plot, create tension, and make the story interesting. Not every conflict in the book is a direct conflict between two people, however. In literature, a conflict can be a struggle between two people or two opposing forces.

One example of this is the conflict between man and nature in Lord of the Flies. When the boys are marooned on an island, their first thought is for survival. The wilderness is not welcoming and they are not accustomed to being forced to fend for themselves. The island itself—the weather, the animals, and the danger—this is the first conflict for the characters in Golding's novel. They address it by finding shelter, gathering and allocating resources, and defending themselves from wild animals.

At the beginning of the novel, the boys don't even know how to light a fire:

Ralph and Jack looked at each other while society paused about them. The shameful knowledge grew in them and they did not know...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 924 words.)

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