What is the conflict of The Winter Room by Gary Paulsen?  

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The main conflict is between the protagonist , Eldon, and the changing of life. Over the course of the book he describes the changing of seasons and what they mean to him. For example, people around him love the spring because it signifies new life, but, citing the maggots that...

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The main conflict is between the protagonist, Eldon, and the changing of life. Over the course of the book he describes the changing of seasons and what they mean to him. For example, people around him love the spring because it signifies new life, but, citing the maggots that are drawn to rotting animals, Eldon thinks of it as a sign of mess and disorder.

Most of all, Eldon dislikes the fall because it is a time of slaughter. He describes the slaughtering of a pig by saying that it cannot be shot before its throat is cut, because all of the blood must be drained. When Eldon watches the Pig bleed out, he cannot help but feel that he is doing something fundamentally wrong, even though he knows that sacrifices such as these are necessary to sustain life through nourishment. It is struggles such as these to accept the natural order of things that create the main conflict of the novel.

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There are two main conflicts in this book.  The first is man vs. nature.  The story centers around a boy growing up on a farm, and life is dictated by seasons.  Eldon notes that there are challenges with each season.  Spring brings rotting animals, summer brings complicated and arduous farming, fall involves butchery, and winter keeps everyone indoors.

The second main conflict is a combination of character vs. self and character vs. character. Uncle David is upset when he learns that Wayne says that his stories are lies, and this leads him to feel old and useless.  He solves both conflicts by chopping the logs with his axe, proving to himself and everyone else that he is not worthless and still has both inner and physical strength.

 

 

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