What is the conflict and plot of the Swiss Family Robinson?

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The Swiss Family Robinson is a fun book to read; however, it is not exactly filled with a deep plot or realistic conflicts and resolutions. The general plot is a survival story. The family is shipwrecked on an island, and they have to survive. They make several different shelters over...

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The Swiss Family Robinson is a fun book to read; however, it is not exactly filled with a deep plot or realistic conflicts and resolutions. The general plot is a survival story. The family is shipwrecked on an island, and they have to survive. They make several different shelters over the course of the novel, and they must obtain other basic survival necessities like food and water. What's a bit unrealistic is how easily they do these things and how great their inventions are. The family essentially creates a utopia without much of the hardships that viewers see in modern day survival stories. While perhaps unrealistic, it in no way takes the fun out of the fantasy that is the plot. Regarding conflict, the book is full of little conflicts that have to be solved by the family. In general, the conflicts are man vs. nature conflicts, and that makes perfect sense given the plot and setting. If I have to pick a second conflict type, I would pick man vs. man. The family doesn't always see eye to eye on every issue, problem, and solution; however, the book doesn't contain anything like a central "bad guy" that's trying to kill the family and destroy their island utopia.

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The plot of "The Swiss Family Robinson" is a simple story of survival.  A family (consisting of two parents and four sons) is shipwrecked on a deserted island on their way to a distant colony to start life anew.  Finding themselves on their own, they rely on their faith and ingenuity to build a home for themselves.

For over a decade they build homes and labor-saving devices, etc., to create a paradise for themselves.  Their eventual discovery leads, not to rescue, but the decision to remain on the island and continue their lives that they have created.

As with most survival stories, the conflict is man vs. nature.  However, due to the relatively benign depiction of nature on the island, there is not much of a conflict other than the establishment of a civilized home for themselves.  With no outside interference, the Robinsons live a life of peace and relatively conflict-free existence.  The flat characters are shown to be adept at using their creativity to create a utopia.

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