What conflict do the bells and the wind present in "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"?

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In Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening ," the bells represent time and society's obligatory creations while the wind is representative of Nature.  The horse gives "his harness bells a shake" to remind the poet that he has worldly obligations to fulfill as he stops to contemplate...

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In Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," the bells represent time and society's obligatory creations while the wind is representative of Nature.  The horse gives "his harness bells a shake" to remind the poet that he has worldly obligations to fulfill as he stops to contemplate and enjoy the beauty of nature, whose only sound is the

sweep/Of easy wind and downy flake.

Thus, the conflict that presents itself is one between that of society and its obligations--"promises to keep"--and the natural world whose "woods are lovely, dark and deep."

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