What conclusion does Siddhartha draw about the difference between knowledge and learning?

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Siddhartha's entire journey through life is a "learning process" in which, as with many other characters in literature, he seeks some level or degree of fulfillment beyond the usual experiences of "ordinary" people. The process is one that is arguably never completed. He begins with a deliberate effort of self-denial but finds that this is unsatisfactory. Then he transitions into what is essentially the opposite of the ascetic life of a samana . By becoming a businessperson and living with the beautiful courtesan Kamala, Siddhartha is enveloped in worldliness—physical, material comfort. It is...

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In the novel Siddhartha by the German existentialist Herman Hesse, the parable of Enlightenment depicts the lack of a meaningful distinction between knowledge and learning. Whereas in the West the latter is a means to the former, for the Buddha (the character known as Siddhartha Gautama, a.k.a. Shakyamuni) this is a false dichotomy. In a state of oneness, there is no longer such a thing as knowledge. Learning is a path to a point in time, and once an individual arrives at such a moment, the illusion of reality becomes manifest. Hesse illustrates the sense of open-endedness experienced by Siddhartha as melancholy. Without a path forward, the human soul must await its consummation with the body, known to Buddhists and existentialists alike as Nirvana.

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