What were the consequences of the Morant Bay rebellion in Jamaica?  

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Although slavery had long since been abolished in Jamaica, most black people on the island remained poor and disenfranchised. The existing system of government had effectively been rigged to ensure continued white dominance. Inevitably, there were grumblings of discontent, compounded by a succession of failed harvests. The situation on the island was tense in the extreme, and it was just a matter of time before some kind of uprising took place.

Edward John Eyre, the English governor, was in total denial about the full scale and extent of the many serious economic and social problems engulfing Jamaica. He ignored the islanders' grievances, concerned that any concessions, no matter how mild, would encourage Jamaicans to make further demands. The unwillingness of the colonial authorities to deal with the natives' concerns served to increase tensions still further, making it more likely that violent disorder would break out.

And so it did. The proximate cause of what came to be known as the...

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