What compromise does Atticus make with Scout?

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Atticus agrees with Scout that they will still read together. 

Atticus was in the habit of reading to Scout, following the words with his finger.  Because of this, and because of Calpurnia's giving Scout sentences to copy when she wanted to keep her busy, Scout is already able to read...

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Atticus agrees with Scout that they will still read together. 

Atticus was in the habit of reading to Scout, following the words with his finger.  Because of this, and because of Calpurnia's giving Scout sentences to copy when she wanted to keep her busy, Scout is already able to read fluently when she starts school.  

The young, inexperienced teacher is horrified that Scout has been taught to read at home.  (She assumes that Scout's father used the wrong methods to teach her.)  She tells Scout not to read outside of school anymore, and she, the teacher, will try to "undo the damage."

Scout does not want to give up one of her favorite pastimes, so she mounts a campaign to get Atticus to let her stop attending school.  When Atticus finds out that one of Scout's main concerns is that she won't be allowed to read outside of school, he tells Scout that he'll still let her read at home as long as she agrees to go to school. 

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