What is a compound sentence, and would this sentence be compound? SAMPLE: We recently moved to the coast; consequently, we aviod the smog problem.

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Some sources define a compound sentence as one in which there are two independent clauses and a coordinating conjunction. The coordinating conjunctions are often referred to as the FANBOYS conjunctions because the first letters of them spell that word: for, and, not, but, or, yet, so.  Your example, of course,...

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Some sources define a compound sentence as one in which there are two independent clauses and a coordinating conjunction. The coordinating conjunctions are often referred to as the FANBOYS conjunctions because the first letters of them spell that word: for, and, not, but, or, yet, so.  Your example, of course, does not have a coordinating conjunction.  But it does have a semi-colon, which takes the place of a coordinating conjunction, and it does have two independent clauses.  Reliable sources do describe sentences with semi-colons as compound sentences.  There are three kinds of punctuation for compound sentences. The third kind is a semicolon in place of an omitted conjunction.  Therefore, this is a compound sentence of the third kind.

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