In regards to irony what are some comparisons between "The Yellow Wallpaper" and The Great Gatsby?I'm writing a paper in which I have to compare the literary device of irony used in "The Yellow...

In regards to irony what are some comparisons between "The Yellow Wallpaper" and The Great Gatsby?

I'm writing a paper in which I have to compare the literary device of irony used in "The Yellow Wallpaper" to its use in The Great Gatsby.

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Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

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In "The Yellow Wallpaper," the narrator employs may instances of verbal irony when she is explaining things, especially about her husband. For instance, when she describes the house in the opening lines, she says that her husband laughs at her impressions of something "queer" about the house, ironically adding that "but one expects that in marriage." Through a double use of irony, the narrator uses verbal irony (saying one thing, meaning another: "I would not say it to a living soul...") to describe an ironic situation when she expresses her ironic sentiment that the reason she is still ill is that her husband is a doctor: "John is a physician, and--perhaps ... that is one reason I do not get well faster."

The Great Gatsby is full of irony, starting with the title: the great Gatsby, though wealthy, on many levels isn't so great, although the narrator does say, "Gatsby turned out all right at the end." There are many ironic situations, such as Gatsby searching nightly for Daisy while she lives just across the bay; Gatsby's new neighbor Nick being a distant cousin of Daisy; hundreds of guests at his many parties but few at his one and only funeral. There are also instances of verbal irony such as when Daisy says of the birth of her daughter that she hopes she'll be a fool: "I’m glad it’s a girl. And I hope she’ll be a fool... ." 

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