What are the comparisons and the constraints to improve Hispanic education attainment of the following: Reducing segregation and isolation by promoting Expanding Fair Housing and Opportunity...

What are the comparisons and the constraints to improve Hispanic education attainment of the following:

  • Reducing segregation and isolation by promoting Expanding Fair Housing and Opportunity through MTO and HOPE program.
  • Early childhood program (Head start)
  • Integrated Social services in schools
  • Recruit qualified teachers

Asked on by lskohleffel

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

All of these methods address the concern that Hispanic students in the United States lag behind Asian and white students in educational attainment. The methods described in your question tackle this issue in two very different ways, either by addressing the underlying socioeconomic causes of the disparities or by adding additional educational resources.

Reducing housing segregation and integrating social services into the schools are both strategies that address the underlying causes of differential educational outcomes, in particular the ways in which poverty can lead to reduced educational achievement. Reducing housing segregation allows Hispanic families to move into areas with better funded school districts, expanding educational opportunity. Social programs and immigration reform are also ways to reduce obstacles to learning such as parents who cannot help in schoolwork due to lack of fluency in English, poor medical care or nutrition leading to poor school performance, and lack of money to have access to computers and the internet for homework. 

Early childhood programs can ensure that Hispanic students enter school on level with other students. Recruiting bilingual teachers with special training in teaching minority students may also be effective.

The main constraints on implementing such reforms are economic and political. All of these solutions cost money, and many taxpayers and politicians who are anti-immigration may block efforts to spend money on helping Hispanic populations. Racism and xenophobia are also obstacles. 

Sources:

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