What comments would you make on the language and the purpose of the dialogue in "Jane Eyre"?What descriptive elements does the writer use? What does your reading make you see? Hear?...

What comments would you make on the language and the purpose of the dialogue in "Jane Eyre"?

What descriptive elements does the writer use?

What does your reading make you see? Hear? Touch? Taste? Smell?

Does the author use any distinctive devices in the novel?

Expert Answers
reidalot eNotes educator| Certified Educator

As a Victorian novel, Jane Eyre broke away from the traditional novel written by a female. Bronte utilizes clear, forceful writing combined with first person narration to produce a work of fiction that is still convincing hundreds of years after publication. The characterization of Jane and Rochester produce a lasting impression in the reader's mind. Bronte uses vivid description to take the reader into Victorian England and Thornfield, Rochester's house. For example, even the "embroderies were wrought by fingers that for two generations had been coffin dust." Repetition is also used to create mood throughout the work, such as "I liked the hush, the gloom, the quaintness..." Bronte also inverts words or phrases for a poetic effect: "Sweet was that evening." As Rochester attempts to convince Jane to remain with him, Bronte's use of emotive language combined with parallel structure is evident:"...What good would it do if I bent, if I uptore, if I crushed her?" Bronte brought to life Jane's world and her dilemma in a novel with themes such as moral courage, a quest for love, and the search for self-fulfillment that are still very much a part of the modern reader's world.