Animal Farm Questions and Answers
by George Orwell

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What commandment is violated in Chapter 7?

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Hollis Sanders eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The commandment that is broken in chapter 7 is "no animal shall kill another animal."

Napoleon, in an attempt to maintain control of the animals and to account for any problem that has occurred on his watch, makes a scapegoat of Snowball. He elaborates on a plot by Snowball to help Mr. Jones defeat the animals that goes all the way back to the Battle of the Cowshed. Squealer speaks on Snowball's treachery and Napoleon's bravery so vividly that the animals begin to believe it.

Napoleon then incites an inquisition to weed out any animals that he deems to be in league with Snowball. Surrounded by his dogs, he orders them to rip out the throats of traitors. They do this to several pigs and the hens that had previously refused Napoleon's new policies of egg production.

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Reuben Lindsey eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Napoleon, in an attempt to maitain control of his farm in its weakened condition, has elevated his tyranny to extreme levels.  He violates the commandment "no animal shall kill another animal" by having the hens and the other "troublesome" animals gathered up and attacked.  He is trying to strike fear into the hearts of his "people" in order to keep them loyal.  However, like most tyrants, his immediate success will be followed by eventual downfall. 

After the deaths, the commandment is changed to "no animal shall kill another animal without reason".  In this changing of commandments, the last commandment is also being violated "all animals are equal".  Clearly, they have not been equal for some time.

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