What is the climax of the story "Little Things Are Big"?

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The climax of this story occurs when the narrator decides not to help the woman with her children or her luggage.

The entire story has been building up to this point, with the narrator grappling with an internal conflict between his culture and upbringing, which dictated that he should be...

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The climax of this story occurs when the narrator decides not to help the woman with her children or her luggage.

The entire story has been building up to this point, with the narrator grappling with an internal conflict between his culture and upbringing, which dictated that he should be offering his assistance to this stranger, and his common sense, which told him that because he was Puerto Rican and had black skin, any offer to help may be perceived as a threat.

The excitement of this great short story reaches a crescendo at this moment, because the audience has, by this point, become emotionally involved in this story and wants to know whether courtesy will emerge victorious over racist rigidity.

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In the story, “Little Things are Big,” the climax is the point when the narrator is faced with the dilemma of a choice between offering his help to a white lady and walking past her leaving her in her predicament.

It is quite late after midnight. In the train, there is a young lady with three small children including a baby on her right arm and a big suitcase in her left hand. Both the narrator and the lady with children will get off at Atlantic Avenue. He knows he must help her to get off the train, and he seems to be willing to do so.

But there is a problem - he is black and she is a white lady. He ruminates over the possible ways the lady might react if he offers to help her. He thinks,

What would she say? What would be the first reaction of this white American woman? Would she say: 'Yes, of course you may help me,' or would she think I was trying to get too familiar or would she think worse? What do I do if she screamed when I went to offer my help?

This is the moment when the story has reached its point of highest tension. The reader is dying to know what the narrator finally chooses to do.

He “pushes by her” and moves on “leaving the children and the suitcase and the woman with the baby in her arms.” He does so with hesitation and a guilty conscience though.

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The climax of the story "Little Things Are Big" is when the narrator, Jesús Colón, decides not to help the white woman who is getting off the New York City subway, even though she has a baby, two other children, and a suitcase because he is afraid of the way that she might perceive his offer of help. Even though, as Colón writes, "courtesy is a characteristic of the Puerto Rican," he decides not to help this woman because he is a what he describes as a Negro and a Puerto Rican. He fears that she might have preconceptions about what people who look like him are like, especially in an empty subway station late at night. He doesn't know whether she'll accept his help or scream for help. As a result, he decides to do nothing at that moment, and he feels that racism has caused him to act in a way that is uncharitable. However, he makes up his mind that in the future, he is going to offer help, no matter how it is perceived.

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