What is the climax of No More Dead Dogs?

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No More Dead Dogs, by Gordon Korman , tells the story of Wallace Wallace, the boy who never lies. Wallace has refused to write a positive review of a book that he hates and is sentenced to detention until he does so. His detention makes him ineligible to play...

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No More Dead Dogs, by Gordon Korman, tells the story of Wallace Wallace, the boy who never lies. Wallace has refused to write a positive review of a book that he hates and is sentenced to detention until he does so. His detention makes him ineligible to play football, which makes him very unpopular with his fellow football players as well as with other students who support the football team.

While serving his detention, Wallace becomes more and more involved in the production of the school play, which just happens to be based on the very book that he has refused to praise. He offers insights into how to make the play more believable and eventually takes on the role of directing the play.

The climax of the action in the book comes when, mimicking his famous touchdown from the previous year, Wallace Wallace dives on top of a sabotaged prop during the performance of the play, protecting everyone from the explosion of a cherry bomb. The audience reacts to this scene as though it has all been planned; instead of seeing the explosion as ruining the play, they clap even harder. The play is a wild success.

There is another climax in this book, however, which comes when Wallace lies. He tells Rachel, the president of the drama club that he, Wallace, is responsible for the play’s sabotage. He tells this lie to protect her from the knowledge that it is actually her own brother who has been sabotaging the play all along.

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The climax may seem to be when Old Shep explodes on the stage. However, it is when Wallace lies to Rachel and tells her he was responsible for all of the acts of vandalism. He did it to protect her from the knowledge that her own little brother had done all of these things. The conflict in the story was that Wallace Wallace could not lie. When he finally does lie, to spare the feelings of a girl he likes, the conflict is resolved. That is the definition of climax-the resolution of a story's conflict.

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