What are the classifications of a Lewis acid and a Lewis base? Lewis acid and lewis base

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Lewis acids→An electron pair acceptor

Example→BF3

Lewis base→An electron pair donor

Example→NH3, OH-

The reaction of a lewis acid and lewis base will lead to the formation of coordinate covalent bond, lewis base donates its electron pair to lewis acid

Lewis acids are electrophillic so all the cations are lewis...

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Lewis acids→An electron pair acceptor

Example→BF3

Lewis base→An electron pair donor

Example→NH3, OH-

The reaction of a lewis acid and lewis base will lead to the formation of coordinate covalent bond, lewis base donates its electron pair to lewis acid

Lewis acids are electrophillic so all the cations are lewis acids since they are ready to accept the electron, along with the incomplete octet rule molecule can form lewis acids...

Where as...

Lewis bases are Nucleophillic they are ready to donte electrons...

Example→ OH-, CN- etc.,

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The definition of a Lewis acid is a substance that is an electron pair acceptor.  This would include most, if not all, metal ions, as they generally are in need of electrons to balance the positive charge  they have from the proton-electron imbalance of ion status.  For example, hydrogen ions (H+) quickly accept an electron pair from a sulfate ion (SO4-2) to form H2SO4, sulfuric acid.  The definition of a Lewis base would be any substance that is an electron pair donor.  In the example mentioned above, the sulfate ion (SO4-2), donates two electrons to a pair of hydrogen ions (H+) in the formation of H2SO4, sulfuric acid.  This satisfies the ionic imbalance of the sulfate ion, which has a -2 charge.  It should be noted that most substances are classified as Bronsted-Lowry acids and bases, where an acid is considered a substance that is a proton donor (H+) and a base is a proton acceptor (OH-).

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