illustration of author Mitch Albom sitting next to Morrie Schwartz, who is lying in a bed

Tuesdays With Morrie

by Mitch Albom
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What class does Morrie teach?

Morrie teaches several classes while at Brandeis University as a professor of sociology. He also teaches one final "class" to Mitch, sharing with him all he's learned about life.

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Morrie teaches several courses over his years spent at Brandeis University. When Mitch Albom is a student there, he takes them all. In 1994, Morrie hobbles into the classroom to teach his final course, one he has taught to students for two decades: Social Psychology. As he begins the course...

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Morrie teaches several courses over his years spent at Brandeis University. When Mitch Albom is a student there, he takes them all. In 1994, Morrie hobbles into the classroom to teach his final course, one he has taught to students for two decades: Social Psychology. As he begins the course for the final time, he reveals to his students that he may not be able to finish teaching it, because he has a terminal illness.

Morrie also teaches one final "class" to a single student, Mitch Albom. As Morrie prepares to die, he and Mitch meet together over a series of Tuesdays. The two of them discuss lessons of living and dying as Mitch continues to absorb the wisdom of his former teacher. The two discuss meaningful topics such as death, aging, family, and emotions. The class meets at Morrie's home, and Mitch travels seven hundred miles for each private class. The topics of these private lessons were planned to become a book which Mitch would publish.

Morrie was treasured by his students because of his openness and acceptance. Many of his former students visited him when they learned of his imminent death, and Mitch values his former teacher's perspective; Morrie believed that his students were a "raw but precious thing," and each could be "polished to a proud shine." It was this attitude that endeared Morrie to his students.

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