What clan does Alan Breck belong to?

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Alan Breck is a member of the Stewart clan. He is the perfect model of a Scottish Highlander. Fiercely independent, yet loyal to his clan, Alan shows Davie the ways of Highland culture, traditions, and society. He is Davie's guide in the Scotish wilderness but also becomes his good friend....

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Alan Breck is a member of the Stewart clan. He is the perfect model of a Scottish Highlander. Fiercely independent, yet loyal to his clan, Alan shows Davie the ways of Highland culture, traditions, and society. He is Davie's guide in the Scotish wilderness but also becomes his good friend. As a true member of his Highland clan, Alan Breck speaks fluent Gaelic is active in the Jacobite uprisings. Like many members of the Stewart clan, Alan Breck is a proud Catholic and active supporter of Bonnie Prince Charlie.

The Alan Breck of the novel is loosely based on an actual historical figure. The historical Alan Breck Stewart fought in the British army before defecting to the Jacobite cause. After the Scots' defeat at the Battle of Culloden, he ran away to France. Later he returned to Scotland where he once again got on the wrong side of the law after being implicated in the murder of a royal tax collector.

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Alan Breck, or Alan Breck Stewart, to give him his full name, is a member (appropriately enough) of the Stewart clan. Alan is not really a dynamic character in the story. He exists rather as a helper to David, a loyal assistant who will guide him (and us) through the strange, exotic world of the Scottish Highlands. Stevenson also uses him to provide a touch of dash and color to the story, in keeping with its status as a rollicking tale of high adventure.

Clan is of huge importance to Alan; and he is fiercely loyal to the Stewarts, ready to defend their honor with sword or musket at the drop of a hat. Alan provides a neat contrast to David, in that David is less worldly and also much less grounded. Alan's close ties to his land, his clan, and his religion emphasize the great importance of loyalty, one of the book's most notable themes.

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