What is the characterization of Othello?

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If you are speaking of the characterization, that is how other characters construct him, it depends on who is characterizing him. He is spoken of most often by Iago, who refers to him constantly as a "Moor", and uses animal imagery whenever he makes reference to him. So the insinuation from Iago's perspective is that he is beast-like.

He describes himself as "rude in speech" and untutored, but he is hardly that. He certainly speaks well enough to infatuate (not in a sexual sense) Desdemona's father, and to seduce Desdemona.

He is brave and adventurous, he is in fact the best general the Duke has at his disposal. He is confident in battle; however, he is not confident with people. He may not actually be "rude in speech" but the fact that he thinks of himself this way (if this was not a rhetorical move) suggests that in social situations he feels somewhat inferior to others. This is significant because he is quick to credit Iago with having a superior understanding of people. And it is true....

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 553 words.)

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