Identify a characteristic of the British Empire in its Golden Age.

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Historians actually have differing opinions in classifying the “Golden Age” as occurring during the Elizabethan Era or the Victorian Era. Since Queen Elizabeth had far more power as monarch than did Queen Victoria, I will classify the Golden Age here as coinciding with Queen Elizabeth’s reign.

The Golden Age of...

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Historians actually have differing opinions in classifying the “Golden Age” as occurring during the Elizabethan Era or the Victorian Era. Since Queen Elizabeth had far more power as monarch than did Queen Victoria, I will classify the Golden Age here as coinciding with Queen Elizabeth’s reign.

The Golden Age of the Elizabethan Era was defined by great prosperity. Following the rules of Henry VII and Henry VIII, England had a well-organized and effective government and enjoyed economic gains in Atlantic Trade.

People enjoyed much peace in England during this period and had time left to pursue other interests. As a result, the arts flourished. Shakespeare found his start during this time, and poets such as Thomas Wyatt and Edmund Spencer found wide audiences as well. Clothing was characteristically ornate with complex embroidery and expensive fabrics.

This period is considered the peak of the English Renaissance, and this is due in large part to the prosperity England enjoyed during Queen Elizabeth’s rule.

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I would say that one of the traits of the British Empire at its height was the mammoth reach it had into so many aspects of life.  The British Empire was expansive and sought to control so much of that which it appropriated.  There was little understated about this.  When Cecil Rhodes declares "Cape to Cairo," he is merely reflecting an attitude about the British Empire in Africa, in terms of its desire to reach out and control so very much.  This was done through economic, military, and social means. The British Empire's defining characteristic at its height of its power was how embedded it was in the worlds in which it controls.  There was little in way of separation of spheres.  The British Empire infiltrated, some would say "infected," each aspect of being in the world that it controlled.  It sought to increase its hold over these nations through economic, political, and social means.  This becomes one of the defining traits of the British Empire at its height, in that there was little about it that was subdued or understated.  The expressed desires of the British Empire was to control and to ensure dominion over that which it sought.  In this, one of the most dominant traits of omnipresence by any means necessary helps to characterize the British Empire at its height of power.

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