What are the character traits of Old Man Warner in the short story "The Lottery"?

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Old Man Warner has experienced more of the town's lotteries than anyone else--77 in all. Older than all of the rest of his neighbors, he is a fanatic supporter of the lottery, and the talk about another local village considering its abolishment is "crazy" to him. He symbolizes the old...

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Old Man Warner has experienced more of the town's lotteries than anyone else--77 in all. Older than all of the rest of his neighbors, he is a fanatic supporter of the lottery, and the talk about another local village considering its abolishment is "crazy" to him. He symbolizes the old ways of the past, and he will be the last man in the village to accept any kind of change. Unlike some of the others, who joke about their neighbors and allow their children to play games and "roll in the dust," Old Man Warner treats the lottery seriously. He is at the forefront of his neighbors when Tessie is designated as the "winner," encouraging them to "Come on, come on, everyone."

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