What is a character sketch of Megadorus?

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Noelle Thompson | High School Teacher | eNotes Employee

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Megadorus is a good character to choose for a character sketch because one can do so easily and briefly.  In fact, Megadorus teaches the reader much about the differences between love and money.

Much more than an old and wealthy neighbor of Euclios, Megadorus shows the reader that love is more important than money.  Megadorus hates the idea of having to marry a rich woman of high society because that kind of woman tends to nag and waste money. 

Far from being a curmudgeon, Megadorus is meant to teach the reader of the dangers posed by rich women.  In fact, Megadorus uses satire to mock women of high society with outlandish and opulent taste.  No matter what, though, other characters (such as Eunomia, who is Megadorus’ sister) simply want him to settle down, get married, and have children.

Instead, Megadorus becomes attracted to (and falls in love with) a young woman in poverty named Phaedria.  Megadorus is so good-natured that he gives up a marriage to this beautiful young woman so that his own nephew, Lyconides, can marry her. 

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jeffclark | College Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

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As in many ancient writings, the plot in "The Pot of Gold" centers around the clash between the rich and the poor. The classes were strictly divided and harbored deep mistrust toward each other.

Euclio, a miserly old man whose ancestors as well as he had angered the family god, was among the poor class. Ironically, their displeasing the god had caused him to not reveal to any of them a pot of gold that had been hidden by other ancestors more pleasing to him.

His daughter, Phaedria, on the other hand had become extremely endeared by the god. Therefore the location of the gold is revealed. Phaedria, in the meantime, has been seduced and become pregnant by Lyconides.

Now enters Megadorus, the uncle of Lycondies, who himself has been enamored by the young Phaedria and offers to marry her himself, not knowing of the connection between her and his nephew. He offers to do so without a dowry of any kind, and even to pay for the wedding himself. Euclio sees this generous offer as simply a plot by a rich man to take his newfound fortune.

After many twists and turns there is indeed a wedding, but not between Megadorus and Phaedria.

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