What chapter can you find Atticus having to shoot the rabid dog in "To Kill A Mockingbird"?In the novel, Atticus is called upon when there is a rabid dog in the street. What metaphor is present in...

What chapter can you find Atticus having to shoot the rabid dog in "To Kill A Mockingbird"?

In the novel, Atticus is called upon when there is a rabid dog in the street. What metaphor is present in terms of Atticus defending Tom Robinson and how is this metaphor extended in relation to the end that Tom Robinson meets?

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amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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This scene with the rabid dog appears in Part I, Chapter 10 of the book.  The metaphor is something akin to the "underdog".  Tom is the underdog for several reasons--he is black, he is poor, and he is shunned for considering himself above the Ewells when he says he helped her because he "felt sorry for her."  Of course, Tom, much like a caged and sick animal (not unlike the rabid dog), does not do well in prison.  He attempts to escape and is shot in the process.  Unfortunately, Atticus is forced to shoot and kill the defenseless dog (which didn't ask to be infected with rabies), and Tom Robinson is shot in much the same way.  Neither the dog nor Tom Robinson asked for their situations nor did they deserve them.  It's just the way the cards fell for them.

Bravery is exhibited on many levels in this chapter.  Atticus was brave to step out into the middle of the street and face this rabies-infected dog, and he also showed another kind of courage by hiding a talent he isn't particularly proud of--his sharp-shooting.  Scout and Jem are equally impressed and surprised to learn something new about Atticus.  Scout admires him for his shooting ability; Jem admires Atticus for his restraint and respect for the animal.

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