The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

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What is the central argument in The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks?

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In The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Rebecca Skloot argues that the medical community cannot exploit people to further their research but rather must require informed consent and respect all people who are involved in contributing to their research. 

Skloot's argument rests on the case of a woman named Henrietta Lacks. Lacks died from incurable cervical cancer in 1951, and scientists took cells from her cervix without ever asking for consent from her or her surviving family. These cells were sent to scientists all over the world and formed the basis for many scientific studies.

The cells are referred to as HeLa cells—after the woman they came from. Howard Jones and Richard TeLinde, doctors at John Hopkins, took cells from Lacks without asking for permission; doing so wasn't required at that time. They gave those cells to George Gey, a scientist who used them to create the first line of immortal cells in the world.

Still, her family didn't know how her cells had been taken,...

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