What causes blood clots to develop after the insertion of a foley catheter in a male patient?    The patient has been paralyzed from an auto accident since 1975, but has never had problems...

What causes blood clots to develop after the insertion of a foley catheter in a male patient?

 

 

The patient has been paralyzed from an auto accident since 1975, but has never had problems with catheters before.  He is 57 years old.  He also has pressure sores, Stage 4, on his ankles.

Asked on by nancymorse

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marbar57 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

I would have to say that your patient is probably showing signs of vascular and/or circulatory breakdown, brought on by his inactivity since his accident. 

As a person ages, there's a natural deterioration of his blood vessels, which can lead to vascular and circulatory problems later on in life.  He can slow down, even reversing, the process through diet, an active lifestyle, and consistent physical exercise.  But, when a person become wheelchair-bound or bedridden, even with physical therapy, his body deteriorates much more rapidly. 

There's an old saying about muscles that goes like this:  "Use it or lose it!"  Not only has your patient lost the use of his muscles, but he is now losing muscle tissue and tone, and his skin and circulatory system are beginning to lose their tone, elasticity, and ability to heal.  The pressure sores on his ankle are a result of his poor circulation.  The blood begins to pool at the site, causing the skin to thin and ulcerate.

In addition to the above-mentioned circulatory issues, it also occurred to me that the blood clotting from the catheter may be due to its improper insertion or is a side effect of a drug he's currently taking.  Many drugs thicken the blood, causing it to clump and clot, especially where there's damaged tissue or any foreign object that's introduced to the body.  Another cause for the clot could be the body's antigens forming against a foreign object.  That cathetor might not be compatible to his system and may need to be replaced with another kind or brand.

These are all points to consider, and a medical doctor needs to be consulted for the puzzle to be solved.  Hope this helps!

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