What caused the Dust Bowl conditions on the Great Plains?

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The Dust Bowl is a term that describes the horrible conditions farmers faced in the Great Plains in the 1930s. There were several reasons for the occurrence of the Dust Bowl. One of these was the use of questionable farming methods. Because farmers were producing too many crops, they were...

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The Dust Bowl is a term that describes the horrible conditions farmers faced in the Great Plains in the 1930s. There were several reasons for the occurrence of the Dust Bowl. One of these was the use of questionable farming methods. Because farmers were producing too many crops, they were getting very low prices for them. As a result, farmers began to leave some parts of their fields unplanted. However, because the farmers used their plows to uproot the grasses and because the fields weren’t planted, there was nothing to hold the soil in place. When a drought hit the Great Plains in the 1930s, the soil dried up and the wind blew away the fertile topsoil. As a result, the fields were now useless for planting crops. When farmers couldn’t pay their mortgage because they weren’t producing crops, they lost their farms to the bank. The Dust Bowl brought many hardships to the farmers on the Great Plains in the 1930s.

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