What is the cause of the conflict between Piggy and Jack? Why is it significant that Piggy, for the first time, helps to gather firewood only after Jack has broken from the group? Why does Piggy...

What is the cause of the conflict between Piggy and Jack? Why is it significant that Piggy, for the first time, helps to gather firewood only after Jack has broken from the group? Why does Piggy feel liberated?

Expert Answers
hebronchester90 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The island William Golding depicts in Lord of the Flies represents the world. Jack and Piggy are personality types. The cause of the conflict is ideological.

Piggy is cerebral. He has many ideas, but they are ignored as he does not fight for physical power. He maintains order in the group. His usefulness is unseen because of his physical laziness, so his mental capacity presents unnoticed value to the group.

Jack is the opposite. He focuses on physical power and seen leadership. He is a leader-personality who wants to be seen as just that: a chief. He is useful to the group in presenting new ideas, changing the path from what he considers boring. In turn, this lust for power and change becomes evil.

Piggy is liberated when Jack is gone because Jack is an oppressive force, particularly to Piggy's artisan personality. It is the lust of power versus the lack of power. The lust always beats down the lack, therefore Piggy is understandably intimidated by Jack. He helps gather firewood because it is better to work out of genuine interest versus oppression.

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Lord of the Flies

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