What careless act happens at the end of the party in chapter 3 in The Great Gatsby?

The careless act which happens at the end of chapter 3 of The Great Gatsby is a car accident caused by a drunk driver. The car veered off the ditch, and the driver was so drunk that he did not realize that the steering wheel had broken off.

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As the first party Nick attends at Gatsby's mansion ends, a slow line of cars heads home. One, driven by a drunk driver, hits a "jut" in a wall and is "violently shorn of one wheel."

This careless act causes a traffic jam and much wonderment over the wheel...

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As the first party Nick attends at Gatsby's mansion ends, a slow line of cars heads home. One, driven by a drunk driver, hits a "jut" in a wall and is "violently shorn of one wheel."

This careless act causes a traffic jam and much wonderment over the wheel being detached from the car. Owl-eyes himself steps from the car and is chided for driving while drunk. He says he is not the one to blame:

"You don’t understand," explained the criminal. "I wasn’t driving. There’s another man in the car."

This little story breaks off abruptly without a conclusion, except for Nick looking back at Gatsby on his porch, apparently unaware of what is going on, mechanically holding his hand up in a farewell gesture to his guests. Nick describes him as in "complete isolation."

The incident is notable primarily for foreshadowing the fatal car accident that will occur when Daisy runs over Myrtle near the end of the novel. As with this accident, onlookers will mistake who was driving the car. Daisy will be characterized by Nick as, along with Tom, a careless person who smashes up lives and goes on, leaving others to clean up the mess.

The incident also emphasizes how alone and out of touch Gatsby is, despite the huge parties he throws, foreshadowing his isolation by the pool near the end of the novel.

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In chapter 3, Nick Carraway attends one of Jay Gatsby's magnificent summer parties and experiences conflicting feelings regarding the ostentatious event. Toward the beginning of the evening, Gatsby's guests maintain their civility and preserve what Nick refers to as "a dignified homogeneity," which mirrors that of East Egg. When Nick and Daisy begin to search for Jay Gatsby, they run into an intoxicated man they call Owl Eyes in Gatsby's enormous library. Owl Eyes is completely wasted and struggles to carry on a meaningful conversation with Nick and Jordan. As the evening progresses, Gatsby's guests lose their dignified manner, and the party spins out of control.

By the end of the evening, nearly everyone is drunk, and Nick witnesses several couples arguing with each other. Nick is one of the last people to leave the party and witnesses the result of a careless act when he sees the outcome of a car wreck. A drunk driver had crashed his coupé into a ditch on the side of the road near Gatsby's home and lost a wheel during the accident. Nick watches as Owl Eyes climbs from the vehicle, and the onlooking crowd initially thinks he was the driver. Another intoxicated man proceeds to get out of the driver's side of the vehicle and stumbles to the ground. Nick is astonished and disgusted by the careless accident, which underscores the negative side of the Roaring Twenties. The car crash also foreshadows the incident involving Myrtle Wilson's accidental death later in the story.

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I would argue that the careless act being referred to here takes place throughout chapter 3, and the act being referred to here is excessive drinking. This chapter tells the story of the first of Gatsby’s famous parties that Nick gets invited to.

As soon as Nick arrives at the party, he realizes that it is just like the ones he has been observing over the previous few weeks. The liquor was flowing freely, and the party was raucous. Nick is initially confused because he can’t find Gatsby, and nobody seems to care where he is. While searching for Gatsby, Nick and Jordan come across a character referred to as “Owl Eyes” who has already been drunk for an entire week.

The final stage of this careless act, which takes place at the end of the chapter, is that Owl Eyes was in a car when it veered off the ditch and the driver, who was too intoxicated to understand what was going on, didn’t realize that the steering wheel had broken off. To prove just how drunk he is, the first thing he says to the crowd after he makes it out of the car is to ask if he had run out of gas.

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In Chapter 3 of The Great Gatsby, Nick (the narrator) attends his first party given by his neighbor, Jay Gastby. The incident of carelessness that occurs at the end of the evening involves drunken driving as the guests are leaving the party. Nick recounts that, as he is leaving the party, he sees a commotion fifty feet from the door where a car has been driven into a ditch "right side up but violently shorn of one wheel." The spectators assume that the man who first alights from the vehicle is the one who wrecked. He, in his drunken stupor, takes a few moments to explain to the crowd that he was not the driver. Once the true driver makes his way from the car, it is obvious that he should not have been driving as his first statement to the crowd is, "Wha's matter? Did we run outa gas?"

This example of recklessness stands out in the text because everyone involved in the situation is incapable of functioning responsibly. The driver is too drunk to even realize that his car is in a ditch and can't be moved. The passenger is too drunk to realize that he shouldn't have allowed the driver behind the wheel. The crowd is too drunk to reasonably explain the situation or discover how to resolve it. This situation foreshadows events that will occur later in the text revolving around irresponsibility and vehicles.

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