What can you infer from the colossal size of the statue in Shelley's "Ozymandias"?

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The suggestion offered in the poem is that at one point in time, the statue was larger than life as was the ruler.  The belief was that the ruler for whom the statue was based was powerful and commanding of many an army.  The boastful statement of "Look upon my...

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The suggestion offered in the poem is that at one point in time, the statue was larger than life as was the ruler.  The belief was that the ruler for whom the statue was based was powerful and commanding of many an army.  The boastful statement of "Look upon my works, ye mighty and despair" and the notion of being a "king of kings" helps to illuminate that at one point in time, the ruler possessed great power.  It is at this point where the poem offers some profound insight.  The notion of ruling and being an effective ruler might not lie with power, but rather with how one uses that power and what is done in order to cement one's legacy as a political leader.  Ozymandias was a powerful ruler, but the decrepit condition of the statue and the unknown nature of the leader help to illuminate that power on its own does not guarantee one's legacy or lasting success.  What one does with that power for the betterment of others and the desire to create a foundation upon which future generations can develop is where true immortality lies, and is something that the leader in Shelley's poem might not have done.

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