What can we say about resistance and political issues in A Walk in the Night, and how can we demonstrate it through the book? How can we involve history and literature together to talk about...

What can we say about resistance and political issues in A Walk in the Night, and how can we demonstrate it through the book? 

How can we involve history and literature together to talk about resistance?

Expert Answers
Ashley Kannan eNotes educator| Certified Educator

This is a fairly powerful issue and one that strikes at the very heart of teaching and learning in any domain.  I would say that there are two issues present.  The first issue would be how resistance and political issues are present in the work.  In order for this to be done, one should analyze La Guma presents the issues of race and class, as well as their impact on the community in general.  How does Michael navigate these realities?  What does social and economic disenfranchisement impact him?  Does he capitulate to these in a manner that reflects defeatism in the face of "what is" or does he seek to overcome them in articulating a condition of "what can be?"  I think your reading of this might be essential in addressing such questions. The larger issue would be how literature and history converge in the narrative of resistance, and this is quite fascinating.  In both realms, of the heart and of the state, individuals invariably find themselves in the position of having to articulate a narrative of seeking to overcome social and political obstacles within consciousness.  History and literature can serve as tools to narrate this resistance to what is in the hopes of what can be.  In this manner, one sees the development of both as being an experience articulated from "the bottom up" as opposed to the "top down."  In seeing the paradigm in this light, I would stress that both literature and history have a vital role in articulating this point of view and the essential role resistance has in it.

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A Walk in the Night

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