What can be a great science fair project for a 10th grader?What can be a great science fair project for a 10th grader?

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bandmanjoe's profile pic

bandmanjoe | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

I agree with #5 above.  The best science fair projects are about something you are genuinely interested in, something you have a question about, and have conducted an experimental procedure in an attempt to gain some insight towards the answer.  Having judged science fairs before, it is always refreshing to find that young mind who has done such, and can accurately present their findings based upon solid experimental procedure.

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I think the best science project should be something that you are interested in or curious about. Since you are in 10th grade, you are probably taking a science class. Have you wanted to know more about any concept you have studied, or something you see in the world around you?
pacorz's profile pic

pacorz | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

You really need to move this question to the discussion forum, so you can benefit from several people's answers. However here are my thoughts.

There are tons of great project ideas out there, but the one thing that makes a science fair project stand out is the scientific method. You should be trying to prove or disprove something with your project. Just building something, no matter how awesome it is, is not really science.

So start your project by using a statement like this: The effect of ___ on ____.

If you want to build something, that's fine, but then prove something with it. To use jackboniver's example of a pizza box oven, you could make one, set it up at different angles relative to the sun, and track the maximum temperature it reaches at each angle. Or you could build several different versions, changing one detail,from version to version (perhaps adding layers of insulation to the outside of the box?) and then set them all up and compare performance.

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