What is Brutus's internal conflict / inner conflict in Julius Caesar?

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Brutus is torn between his love of Caesar and his love of Rome. When he is approached by Cassius about participating in a conspiracy to assassinate Caesar, Cassius appeals to Brutus on the basis of patriotism. While Cassius is driven primarily by fear and resentment at the idea that he might have to bow down to Caesar, who was once his peer, he knows that Brutus loves and is loyal to Caesar--Brutus is, in fact, one of his closest friends. That's why it is important to Cassius to involve Brutus in the plot: if Brutus is part of it, it will lend credence to the conspirators' claim that they acted for the good of Rome.

Brutus is swayed by the idea that it will be a disaster for Rome if Caesar gains too much power and becomes a tyrant. At the same time, he feels deep respect for and faithfulness towards Caesar, his dear friend. He is forced to weight the good of his country against the personal pain he will experience from turning on and betraying his friend.

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The major internal conflict for...

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