What is Brown's motive for going into the forest, what does he expect to find, and how does he expect the rest of his life to be? Nathaniel Hawthorne's "Young Goodman Brown"

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Young Goodman Brown's purpose is to go just one time on what he repeatedly calls an "evil" or "wicked" mission in the woods to participate in a Satanic ritual or "witch-meeting."

He expects he might find "a devilish Indian" lurking behind each tree or the devil himself at this elbow. He expects to be among strangers. Therefore, he is very surprised to see himself amid the town's most religious and seemingly pious people, including the deacon, Goody Cloyse, and even his dear wife Faith as he arrives at the meeting.

Brown is disillusioned by realizing—or perhaps dreaming, as Hawthorne brings up the idea that the witch-meeting was all a dream—that so many of his neighbors, people he thought were good Christians, are actually evil. This turns him into a stern, fearful, and gloomy person whose religious faith is lost as well as his trust in others.

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Hawthorne writes that Goodman Brown departs on an errand for a "present evil purpose," which suggests Brown's curiosity and willingness to...

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