What is the author's attitude toward the protagonist and antagonist in "The Interlopers"?

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hilahmarca eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The author is objective in the sense he never takes sides; however, his word choice indicates he thinks of these two as fools for carrying on this grudge.  He makes a point to mention that the land they are fighting over is relatively useless and not worth fighting over.  He also refers to the feud as "petty".  He also equates their action to that of hunter saying that Ulrich is going out in search of "human prey".  One could also look into the setting, especially the dark, stormy weather, to further show the childish, spiteful actions of these two going out in the worst of conditions for the sole purpose of settling a score.

alix777 | Student

The author is objective in the sense he never takes sides; however, his word choice indicates he thinks of these two as fools for carrying on this grudge.  He makes a point to mention that the land they are fighting over is relatively useless and not worth fighting over.  He also refers to the feud as "petty".  He also equates their action to that of hunter saying that Ulrich is going out in search of "human prey".  One could also look into the setting, especially the dark, stormy weather, to further show the childish, spiteful actions of these two going out in the worst of conditions for the sole purpose of settling a score.

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The Interlopers

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