What are the author's intentions in mentioning the star and the producer?"Perhaps you know that lady." Gatsby indicated a gorgeous, scarcely human orchid of a woman who sat in state under a white...

What are the author's intentions in mentioning the star and the producer?

"Perhaps you know that lady." Gatsby indicated a gorgeous, scarcely human orchid of a woman who sat in state under a white plum tree. Tom and Daisy stared, with that peculiarly unreal feeling that accompanies the
recognition of a hitherto ghostly celebrity of the movies.

It was like that. Almost the last thing I remember was standing with Daisy and watching the moving picture director and his Star. They were still under the white plum tree and their faces were touching except for a pale thin ray of moonlight between. It occurred to me that he had been very slowly bending toward her all evening to attain this proximity, and even while I watched I saw him stoop one ultimate degree and kiss at her cheek

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William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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One of the striking features of Fitzgerald's novel is his descriptions of the glamourous parties given by Gatsby. They seem to symbolize the Jazz Age perhaps more than anything else ever written about the period. Fitzgerald wanted to convey the sense of wealth, conspicuous consumption, dissipation, and hedonistic abandon in this microcosm which represented the same qualities in most American big cities. One aspect of Gatsby's parties that Fitzgerald emphasized was the fact that they attracted such an unusual mixture of strangers from all walks of life. There were gangsters and politicians and entertainers and aristocrats all thrown together. Describing the movie producer with the beautiful movie star was only another way of showing the eclecticism of Gatsby's wild parties and suggesting the hypnotic magnetism of Gatsby himself, a man who had the wealth and power to attract nearly everybody to his mansion. Movies were becoming more and more important in the 1920s, and Fitzgerald must have felt a need to include a couple of film celebrities in his mixture of exotic characters. Fitzgerald himself was intrigued by Hollywood because of the big money they paid writers. In time he became a Hollywood writer himself.

 

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