What are the attitudes of the characters toward the ceremony and why have some of the villages given up on the lottery?

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When Ms. Hutchinson arrives late to the lottery which will ultimately seal her fate, she comments that she has been cleaning the kitchen and preparing for noon lunch. Her seeming indifference to the ceremony, her greater concern for noon dinner, and the general frivolty at hand all underscore the confusion and indifference that most of the villagers feel toward an event that is no longer a time-honored tradition as it was in Old Man Warner's Day.

It is this very indifference which has enabled Ms. Hutchinson's village to forsake many of the lottery's rituals, ranging from the makeup of the black box, the wood chips, and even where or how the box is stored throughout the year. These concerns are no longer of any importance to most. For them, the lottery is a perfunctory matter.

Neighboring societies - which were perhaps more progressive-minded although author Shirely Jackson does not directly comment on this...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 447 words.)

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