What is the attitude towards the Indians in "Young Goodman Brown?"

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When Goodman Brown is in the forest and overhears voices that sound like the town deacon's and minister's, he hears the deacon's voice say,

Of the two, reverend Sir . . . I had rather miss an ordination-dinner than tonight's meeting. They tell me that some of our community are to be here from Falmouth and beyond, and others from Connecticut and Rhode Island; besides several of the Indian powows [sic], who, after their fashion, know almost as much deviltry as the best of us.

Thus, the deacon would much rather be present at the witches' meeting in the forest than be present for an ordination dinner for a new minister of his Christian faith. He is excited about the fact that so many new people are coming from faraway places to tonight's meeting. In addition, he mentions that there will be several high-ranking Indians religious men present who, in their own ways, know almost as much deviltry as the best of them , namely, the Puritans. In other words, then, the deacon seems to suggest that the...

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