What is Atticus' hope for his children's lives?In the book To kill a Mockingbird i need to know what atticus' hope for his children's lives and i would also need the page number and chapter. But i...

What is Atticus' hope for his children's lives?

In the book To kill a Mockingbird i need to know what atticus' hope for his children's lives and i would also need the page number and chapter. But i have the book that is smaller and it has a character on it, in black, and the whole cover is a brown and black like color, and a tree. This book has different page numbers and chapters than the other, bigger(taller) book, so if you cold give these quotes with the smaller book's page numbers and chapters that would be great! Thanks!

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e-martin's profile pic

e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The example that Atticus sets for Jem and Scout, through difficulties and against advice, suggests that he wants his children to be morally strong and independent thinkers. Bowing to social pressure or relenting from a good cause are both shown through his example to be unacceptable. 

Atticus seems to hope his children will maintain the strength to understand and to do the right thing. 

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I think that it is good to note that Atticus does not really care what his children become in material or professional terms.  Just as he went away from his family's traditional occupation, he does not care if they follow in any traditions.  All he wants from them (as others have mentioned) is for them to be good people who care about others and try to see the good in all people.

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Atticus wants his children to grow up knowing how to treat people, all people, right. He wants them to learn empathy, and to understand and accept people from all social classes and races. He also wants them to look at every aspect of a situation before making a judgement.
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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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During Atticus' talk with his brother, Jack, he tells him that he hopes Jem and Scout will trust him enough to come to him when they have questions or problems. Atticus succeeds, since we find on the very first page of the novel that the adult Jem and Scout still seek out their father's advice.

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I agree, and I would add that his admonition that it is "a sin to kill a mockingbird" is another life lesson which Atticus wants his children to learn. The idea that a mockingbird does not want to do anything but sing for us, that it does no harm to others, is applicable to people, as well. Remember that he talks about this when Walter Cunningham comes to lunch at their house, and she doesn't really understand the idea yet. Scout clearly "gets it" by the end of the novel, though, for she sees Arthur "Boo" Radley as a mockingbird to be protected.

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lsumner | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

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Atticus hopes his children will learn tolerance and even appreciation for differences among folks. He specifically instructs Scout to never judge someone "until you climb into his skin and walk around in it" (Chapter 3). Atticus teaches Scout that you really never know what someone else is thinking until you have gone through his experiences. No doubt, Atticus is an extremely caring father and he wants his children to try and understand what others may be experiencing before judging. Atticus knows his children will be happier and healthier if they learn to appreciate differences.

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tokillamockingbird123321 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

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Atticus hopes his children will learn tolerance and even appreciation for differences among folks. He specifically instructs Scout to never judge someone "until you climb into his skin and walk around in it" (Chapter 3). Atticus teaches Scout that you really never know what someone else is thinking until you have gone through his experiences. No doubt, Atticus is an extremely caring father and he wants his children to try and understand what others may be experiencing before judging. Atticus knows his children will be happier and healthier if they learn to appreciate differences.

just kidding i missed the part where it said chapter 3 haha thanks again. (:

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tokillamockingbird123321 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

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Atticus hopes his children will learn tolerance and even appreciation for differences among folks. He specifically instructs Scout to never judge someone "until you climb into his skin and walk around in it" (Chapter 3). Atticus teaches Scout that you really never know what someone else is thinking until you have gone through his experiences. No doubt, Atticus is an extremely caring father and he wants his children to try and understand what others may be experiencing before judging. Atticus knows his children will be happier and healthier if they learn to appreciate differences.

do you know where that quote was located in the book I described?

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tokillamockingbird123321 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

Atticus hopes his children will learn tolerance and even appreciation for differences among folks. He specifically instructs Scout to never judge someone "until you climb into his skin and walk around in it" (Chapter 3). Atticus teaches Scout that you really never know what someone else is thinking until you have gone through his experiences. No doubt, Atticus is an extremely caring father and he wants his children to try and understand what others may be experiencing before judging. Atticus knows his children will be happier and healthier if they learn to appreciate differences.

Thank you sooooooo much, your the BEST!

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