What aspects of Romantic literature are evident in William Blake's poem "London?"

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Blake focuses on the intense emotion experienced by residents of the city: he notices that every face bears "marks of woe" -- all are sad.  The chimney sweeps "cry" and soldiers "sigh," and everyone seems generally despairing and unhappy, not to be comforted by their churches or any scene of beauty; indeed, it seems that there are no such scenes here.  One might conjecture that poem this is an indictment of city life, especially since it is named after the city of London.  We might infer that this is how people feel in cities, in general: disconnected and discontent.  We can also infer, then, that Blake would champion life in the country, a life more connected with Nature, rather than "Palace walls" and "blackning Church[es]."  A privileging of Nature and the natural world over life within the city, surrounded by buildings and dirt and grime, is very much a Romantic move, as is the focus on intense emotion.

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The famous Romanticist William Wordsworth held that good poetry was "the...

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