What are two quotes that show Lady Macbeth manipulating Macbeth in Macbeth?

Two quotes that show Lady Macbeth manipulating Macbeth in Macbeth are the passages in act 1, scene 6, where she asks him, "Was the hope drunk / Wherein you dress'd yourself?" and where she states, "When you durst do it, then you were a man."

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We see Lady Macbeth's absolute willingness to manipulate Macbeth even before he returns to their home. After she receives his letter, in which he acquaints her with his interaction with the Weird Sisters and his subsequent reward with the title Thane of Cawdor, she laments that he is only mildly ambitious and lacks the "illness" that would compel him to "catch the nearest way" to the throne (i.e., killing the current king). She wishes him home so that she can begin her manipulation of him to this end:

Hie thee hither,
That I may pour my spirits in thine ear
And chastise with the valor of my tongue
All that impedes thee from the golden round (1.5.28–31)

In expressing her desire to pour her spirits into his ear, she makes it clear that she intends to persuade and cajole him—to do whatever is necessary to get him to do her bidding.

When he does arrive home, she immediately begins to issue instructions to him on how he should look and behave when the king arrives. She says,

To beguile the time,
Look like the time. Bear welcome in your eye,
Your hand, your tongue. Look like th' innocent
flower,
But be the serpent under 't (1.5.74–78).

She is certainly pouring her spirits into his ear now! She even says that he "shall put / This night's great business into [her] dispatch," implying that she intends to handle all the plans for the murder and that she doesn't want Macbeth involved at all in that part of things (1.5.79–80). When Macbeth expresses his desire to speak further about the matter, she does not relent. Instead, she dismisses his request and says, "Leave all the rest to me" (1.5.86). She tells him what to do, what not to do, what part of the plan she wants him to be involved with, and what parts he should keep out of. She rather masterfully manipulates him prior to the murder of the king.

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In Shakespeare's classic play Macbeth, Lady Macbeth is portrayed as an ambitious, calculating woman, who manipulates her husband to follow through with King Duncan's assassination by questioning his masculinity and assuring him that they will not fail in their wicked endeavor. In act 1, scene 7, Macbeth rehearses to himself all the arguments against killing Duncan and concludes that he will not murder the king. When Lady Macbeth enters the scene, Macbeth tells her, "We will proceed no further in this business" (Shakespeare, 1.7.33). Lady Macbeth is outraged by his immediate change of character and proceeds to insult his masculinity and degrade him for being timid. Lady Macbeth asks,

Art thou afeard
To be the same in thine own act and valor
As thou art in desire? Wouldst thou have that
Which thou esteem’st the ornament of life,
And live a coward in thine own esteem,
Letting “I dare not” wait upon “I would,”
Like the poor cat i' th' adage? (1.7.39–45)

Lady Macbeth is asking her husband if he is afraid to act upon his ambition and calls him a coward for hesitating to take what he desires most in life. She is manipulating him by challenging his masculinity. During the eleventh century, esteemed men were expected to be callous, resolute, and aggressive, which is the complete opposite of how Macbeth is currently acting. In an attempt to justify his decision and respond to his wife's insults, Macbeth says that any man who dares to do more than he should is not a man at all. Lady Macbeth once again displays her manipulative techniques by saying,

When you durst do it, then you were a man;
And to be more than what you were, you would
Be so much more the man (1.7.49–52).

Lady Macbeth continues to question her husband's masculinity and shame him into committing the bloody crime. After ridiculing her husband and making him feel like a timid coward, Lady Macbeth assures him that their plan will be successful by saying,

We fail? But screw your courage to the sticking-place,
And we’ll not fail (1.7.60–62).

Macbeth succumbs to his wife's manipulation and agrees to carry out the assassination, which leads to his tragic downfall.

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The quotes you are looking for are in Act I, Scene vii. Macbeth is having second thoughts about killing Duncan, but Lady Macbeth refuses to allow him to pass up the opportunity to be king. Lady Macbeth says the following lines to him:

Was the hope drunk
Wherein you dress'd yourself? Hath it slept since?(40)
And wakes it now, to look so green and pale
At what it did so freely? From this time
Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard
To be the same in thine own act and valor
As thou art in desire? Wouldst thou have that(45)
Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life
And live a coward in thine own esteem,
Letting “I dare not” wait upon “I would”
Like the poor cat i’ the adage?

Lady Macbeth questions Macbeth's courage, and then says to him:

What beast was't then
That made you break this enterprise to me?
When you durst do it, then you were a man;(55)
And, to be more than what you were, you would
Be so much more the man. Nor time nor place
Did then adhere, and yet you would make both:
They have made themselves, and that their fitness now
Does unmake you. I have given suck, and know(60)
How tender ’tis to love the babe that milks me:
I would, while it was smiling in my face,
Have pluck'd my nipple from his boneless gums,
And dash'd the brains out, had I so sworn as you
Have done to this.(65)

In the quote above, Lady Macbeth questions Macbeth's manliness, knowing that this is the greatest insult she can say to him. Because Lady Macbeth and Macbeth are so close at the beginning of the play, she knows exactly how to manipulate him into committing murder.

 

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