What are two quotes from To Kill a Mockingbird that show the coexistence of good and evil?

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When Atticus goes to Tom's cell to defend him against the Old Sarum gang, he doesn't realize that he has company until the group disperses. As he leaves Tom, telling him that there won't be any further trouble that night, a voice emerges from the darkness above them:

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When Atticus goes to Tom's cell to defend him against the Old Sarum gang, he doesn't realize that he has company until the group disperses. As he leaves Tom, telling him that there won't be any further trouble that night, a voice emerges from the darkness above them:

From a different direction, another voice cut crisply through the night: “You’re damn tootin‘ they won’t. Had you covered all the time, Atticus.”

Mr. Underwood and a double-barreled shotgun were leaning out his window above The Maycomb Tribune office (chapter 15).

It would be easy to characterize Mr. Underwood as a noble man, but it isn't quite that simple. At the beginning of the following chapter, Atticus says this about him:

“You know, it’s a funny thing about Braxton,” said Atticus. “He despises Negroes, won’t have one near him.”

Later we learn that Mr. Underwood seems to take an issue with the fact that the town is persecuting a man with a physical disability; he takes no issue with persecuting people because of race. He is therefore capable of both hatred and noble actions, showing a great complexity that exists within many people in society.

Mayella Ewell herself embodies both good and evil tendencies. It's easy to focus on her shortcomings, and she certainly should take some responsibility for Tom's death. However, she lives a horrid life of abuse, and evidence points to the fact that her father has been physically and sexually abusing her for an indeterminate amount of time. Nevertheless, she takes care of her younger siblings as best as possible, and there is evidence that she longs for something beautiful in her overwhelmingly dark life:

Against the fence, in a line, were six chipped-enamel slop jars holding brilliant red geraniums, cared for as tenderly as if they belonged to Miss Maudie Atkinson, had Miss Maudie deigned to permit a geranium on her premises. People said they were Mayella Ewell's (chapter 17).

Here is a glimpse of Mayella seeking to bring beauty to her world in the tiniest tangible way. She hasn't been gifted a life that allows beauty to touch the darkness that surrounds her. Thus, Mayella's character shows both the potential goodness that could flourish under different circumstances and the evil that she unleashes on Tom because of her father's influence.

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In chapter 11, the readers are introduced to Maycomb's most notorious racist, Mrs. Dubose. As Jem and Scout walk past her home, she yells,

"Your father’s no better than the niggers and trash he works for!" (Lee, 105)

Her derogatory comments infuriate Jem, who ends up destroying her camellia bush. After Atticus makes Jem read to Mrs. Dubose for two hours each day for over a month as an apology, she ends up passing away from a chronic illness. After Mrs. Dubose dies, Atticus explains to his children her difficult situation and tells Jem, "You know, she was a great lady" (115). Atticus elaborates on her valiant battle to break her morphine addiction and says,

"She was the bravest person I ever knew" (116)

Despite being an ugly, outspoken racist, Mrs. Dubose is also a courageous, forgiving woman, who earns Atticus's respect and demonstrates her compassion by giving Jem a white camellia.

In chapter 22, Miss Maudie bakes the children cakes and offers words of encouragement following the Tom Robinson trial. Jem is extremely upset and jaded towards the prejudiced community of Maycomb. Despite the overt prejudice throughout Maycomb, Miss Maudie explains to Jem that there were many people throughout the community who supported Tom Robinson. When Jem asks who helped Tom Robinson, Miss Maudie tells him, 

"His colored friends for one thing, and people like us. People like Judge Taylor. People like Mr. Heck Tate. Stop eating and start thinking, Jem. Did it ever strike you that Judge Taylor naming Atticus to defend that boy was no accident? That Judge Taylor might have had his reasons for naming him?" (219)

Miss Maudie continues to elaborate on the positives surrounding the case by saying,

"It was no accident. I was sittin‘ there on the porch last night, waiting. I waited and waited to see you all come down the sidewalk, and as I waited I thought, Atticus Finch won’t win, he can’t win, but he’s the only man in these parts who can keep a jury out so long in a case like that. And I thought to myself, well, we’re making a step—it’s just a babystep, but it’s a step." (220)

Despite the majority of racist citizens living in Maycomb, some of the community seems to be making steps in the right direction towards equality. Atticus's valiant defense of Tom Robinson and the support from a few sigificant members of the community signifies a positive change in race relations throughout Maycomb.

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 The first one was concerning Mr. Cunningham when the mob attacked the jail in hopes of hanging Tom Robinson.  Scout talks them out of it, and, later, when Scout and Jem talk to Atticus about it, Atticus tells them,

" Mr. Cunningham's basically a good man.....he just has his blind spots along with the rest of us......you'll understand folks better when you're older.  A mob's always made up of people, no matter what.  Mr. Cunningham was part of a mob last night, but he was still a man." (pg 157)

This says that Mr. Cunningham was basically a good man, he just got involved in the emotions of a mob.  That made him almost do an evil thing and kill an innocent man.

The second example is when Atticus is discussing juries with Jem. This occurs after the trial and after the verdict of guilty for Tom Robinson. Atticus tells Jem,

"Those are twelve reasonable men in everyday life, Tom's jury, but you saw something come between them and reason.  You saw the same thing that night in front of the jail......There's something in our world that makes men lose their heads --- they couldn't be fair if they tried.  In our courts, when it's a white man's word against a black man's, the white man always wins.  They're ugly, but those are the facts of life."  (pg 220)

This shows good in that the men are reasonable men, but evil in that they can't be fair and will convict Tom because he is black.

The pages I have given are from my edition of the book, but they should be in close proximity.

 

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