What are two examples of sensory imagery in the story "Rules of the Game" by Amy Tan?

There is a great deal of sensory imagery in "Rules of the Game." One passage describes a high school auditorium "that echoed with phlegmy coughs and the squeaky rubber knobs of chair legs sliding across freshly waxed wooden floors," using auditory imagery. A contrasting passage depicts the alley outside Waverly's apartment with visual imagery, including a depiction of "a printer who specialized in gold-embossed wedding invitations and festive red banners."

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Amy Tan's "Rules of the Game" is full of sensory imagery, with descriptions of the tastes, sounds, and smells of Waverly's childhood, in addition to any number of striking visual images. Taste and smell combine in the "fragrant red beans ... cooked down to a pasty sweetness," while the children use sound to choose the best gifts at the Christmas party, shaking the boxes to see if they can guess the contents from the noise.

When Waverly's picture is taken for a magazine story in which she will be hailed as a child prodigy, she is playing chess in an unfamiliar environment:

I was playing in a large high school auditorium that echoed with phlegmy coughs and the squeaky rubber knobs of chair legs sliding across freshly waxed wooden floors.

The auditory imagery adds to the strangeness of the setting, with two different types of unnatural sound. This is a sharp contrast to Waverly's home, the alley in which she lives, which is described with a wealth of detailed imagery, such as the visual...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 977 words.)

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Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on July 7, 2020